Two Poems by Doug Draime

Thoreau And The Indians

Thoreau called them
savages  from
the English and
French. They
say he didn’t
really mean
anything by it. That
that was just a
common term used to identify
the indigenous people
of this continent,
implemented by the
Europeans who had
invaded it.

But I wonder if anyone back then
ever called a spade a spade
Did anyone ever challenge
this and other white supremacy
thinking written in his
masterpiece, Walden.
Did anyone ever get up in
Henry David’s hairy mug
and lecture him on the ignorance
of such a terminology expressed
toward an entire race of people
Did Ralph Waldo Emerson
love him enough as a friend
to ever point out
this obvious
blind spot
in Thoreau’s pristine contemplation
of  justice
and social disobedience?

________________________


Notes On A Project

a painting
of a lone
rose

blossoming
on a
snowy
peak

in
the
dead
of
winter

painted
on
a
dried
animal
skin

of
an
animal
made
extinct

by the
murderous
lack of
wonder

Advertisements

5 Responses to “Two Poems by Doug Draime”

  1. AS always, Doug Draime, takes on the obvious and gives us a different, enlightened perspective…in other words, WOO HOO Doug!

  2. As always Doug, such fine work–it’s a nice way to wake up on Sunday morning–

  3. Doug Draime Says:

    Thanx much RD & MK. And it’s great to wake up on Sunday morning and read such nice comments. Cheers!

  4. “Notes on a Project” has a real nice flow with a powerful conclusion.

    “Thoreau and the Indians” is a tad didactic, but then again it does make a point. People tend to admire authors and works of literature for the wrong reason, and most of the time it’s because some authority insinuates that this or that is great or important. On some level or another people think that, ‘Well Dr. Smith the Shakespeare scholar says that Hamlet is a literary masterpiece, so if I don’t like it there must be something wrong with me,’ and just swallow it… well, shit. Look who’s getting didactic. I’ll stop right here. Good night.

  5. Doug Draime Says:

    Thanx for your comments Joe.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: